1 Anmerkungen

Heute Design Markt Dortmund

Heute Design Markt Dortmund

Anmerkungen

16923 Anmerkungen

kenetzel:

Adam Colton and his craft.

kenetzel:

Adam Colton and his craft.

Anmerkungen

Check all our works and follow the story on
http://facebook.com/lordre

1870 Anmerkungen

wenigeristmehr:

Hörsaal-Slam – Julia Engelmann – Campus TV

Bravo. Applaus. Und wieder: Bravo!

Cool

9 Anmerkungen

36-frames:

10 questions, one photographer: Aleksandra Kirievskaya

Aleksandra is a 32 year old photographer from Russia. She lives and works in St. Petersburg. Photography is here passion. She started 3 years ago with photography and she told me, that her first thought was: “I really want to give all of my life to this art”.

1. What I really like about your flickr portfolio is that your portraits are very intense. There are a lot of portraits where the models look straight into the camera without a smile but with this intense look. Is this your style when you shoot people? 
Yes, I like the person I shoot, looking into the camera. I want the viewer to come into contact with my photo. Eyes are the windows of our soul. And I invite the viewer to look into these windows and find there themselves.

2. Aleksandra, can you tell us why are still use film? 
I’m often asked this question. My opinion is, that a photograph taken on a film lives. It breathes. When it is completely handmade you can see every speck of dust on the image. You can see the life.

3. Tell us more about your analog Equipment. What are you using at the moment?
I use my favorite Hasselblad camera and Canon EOS5. Recently I acquired a Rolleiflex.

4. What is your favorite Black and white film and what is your favorite color one?
I think, Kodak Tmax and Ilford delta.

5. Your photos are often well composed. For example: There are a woman and a man lying on a bed. In one corner is a mirror with a reflection of the couple. How do you get your inspiration for composing these kind of photos?
Movies, pictures or books – They are my inspiration. In general, of course, films. Tarkovsky’s my favorite Russian film director. I love Bresson’s movies.

6. When I look on your photos I don’t find happiness but they are often very calm and minimalistic.
Yes, this is my style. But true to say it’s me. This is my way of life. Happiness is not only fun and smile. It can be calm and silent.

7. Do you have a favorite photo of your photos? And why is it your favorite one?
This question is very difficult for me - I love the process and I love taking photos. The Viewers love to my photos is important to me, too. I can’t tell you what photo is my favorite one.

8. You have only 104 photos on your flickr portfolio yet. Can we expect more from your great work? 
I do not photograph often. And most of my work is presented on flickr portfolio. Let’s just say the best part. 

9. Do you have some flickr artists that inspire you and which still shoot film? 
Yes, I have some favorite artists. I like to watch the creativity of photographers around the world. I get great pleasure from this.

10. The last sentence is for you - What do want to tell us? Is anything you want to do in future with your analog photography?
My dream is to make an exhibition in Europe. And of course, as any photographer, I want my works continued to touch the soul of my viewers. Thank you.


You find Aleksandras Flickr portfolio: here

36-frames:

10 questions, one photographer: Aleksandra Kirievskaya

Aleksandra is a 32 year old photographer from Russia. She lives and works in St. Petersburg. Photography is here passion. She started 3 years ago with photography and she told me, that her first thought was: “I really want to give all of my life to this art”.


1. What I really like about your flickr portfolio is that your portraits are very intense. There are a lot of portraits where the models look straight into the camera without a smile but with this intense look. Is this your style when you shoot people?
Yes, I like the person I shoot, looking into the camera. I want the viewer to come into contact with my photo. Eyes are the windows of our soul. And I invite the viewer to look into these windows and find there themselves.


2. Aleksandra, can you tell us why are still use film?
I’m often asked this question. My opinion is, that a photograph taken on a film lives. It breathes. When it is completely handmade you can see every speck of dust on the image. You can see the life.


3. Tell us more about your analog Equipment. What are you using at the moment?
I use my favorite Hasselblad camera and Canon EOS5. Recently I acquired a Rolleiflex.


4. What is your favorite Black and white film and what is your favorite color one?
I think, Kodak Tmax and Ilford delta.


5. Your photos are often well composed. For example: There are a woman and a man lying on a bed. In one corner is a mirror with a reflection of the couple. How do you get your inspiration for composing these kind of photos?
Movies, pictures or books – They are my inspiration. In general, of course, films. Tarkovsky’s my favorite Russian film director. I love Bresson’s movies.


6. When I look on your photos I don’t find happiness but they are often very calm and minimalistic.
Yes, this is my style. But true to say it’s me. This is my way of life. Happiness is not only fun and smile. It can be calm and silent.


7. Do you have a favorite photo of your photos? And why is it your favorite one?
This question is very difficult for me - I love the process and I love taking photos. The Viewers love to my photos is important to me, too. I can’t tell you what photo is my favorite one.


8. You have only 104 photos on your flickr portfolio yet. Can we expect more from your great work?
I do not photograph often. And most of my work is presented on flickr portfolio. Let’s just say the best part.


9. Do you have some flickr artists that inspire you and which still shoot film?
Yes, I have some favorite artists. I like to watch the creativity of photographers around the world. I get great pleasure from this.


10. The last sentence is for you - What do want to tell us? Is anything you want to do in future with your analog photography?
My dream is to make an exhibition in Europe. And of course, as any photographer, I want my works continued to touch the soul of my viewers. Thank you.


You find Aleksandras Flickr portfolio: here

Anmerkungen

Bangkok

Bangkok

25 Anmerkungen

florian-weiler:

[ a. u. s. ]º09 on Flickr.

4 Anmerkungen

36-frames:

10 questions, one photographer: Donovan Rees

Donovan is a 34 year-old Londoner and spent most of his life there, apart from four years living in the US. Donovan travels a lot and his outlook on life is international. Actually Donovan is a dealer in rare and antiquarian books, manuscripts and photobooks. His second home is photography and it takes up most of his free time and most of his soul as he told me. 

I found Donovan on flick. I was so inspired cos his portfolio looks a little bit like my own. You found a little bit of everything. Portrait, landscape, streetart and photos from his journeys. Directly i loved his style and that he is open for so many things in photography. So, here comes the interview:


1. What I really like about your flickr portfolio is that you shoot people, landscape and even some street art. Why you do that. What inspires you about photography? 
I’ve always tried to stretch across genres. I didn’t start taking ‘portraits’ as such until quite late, but in some way most of my landscapes and urban scenes are actually about people too. One of the most impactful aspects of a photograph of a wilderness in Iceland or Scotland is the absence of people, so you’re always working in relation to that even if they don’t feature. I like the traces people leave behind on places, physically and emotionally. That applies to portraits too I think, which is why I tend to prefer a context - even when the subject is staring straight at the camera you are only getting a shadow of their presence. One of the most fascinating things for me about photography as a medium is its ability to be truth-telling and fictional at the same time, and one can take it so many ways depending on where you want to sit on that spectrum.

2. Do you have a favorite kind of photography? 
I’m not sure I do. I like to be able to run with whatever situation I’m presented. As a viewer of photography rather than a practitioner I tend to go towards the social documentary photographers first.

3. Some of your especially portrait shoots a made with a digital DSLR, some are made on film. Why do you change between digital and analog photography?
I first came to photography using film, when I took a cranky old Nikkormat and a single 35mm lens to South America on a gap year between school and university. It had no light-meter, so I learned the ‘Sunny 16’ rule and guessed exposures, and it was a fantastic introduction to photography. One of the main reasons I still use film is that, despite all the wonderful conveniences of digital, I don’t experience the same thrill or the same magnificent uncertainty - you leave yourself so little room for serendipity or the unexpected. I do switch back and forth of course, and just for my own sense of security I’ll always shoot weddings using both, though I still tend to prefer the film shots at the end of the day.

4. Why do you still use analog film cameras? Is it because of nostalgia? 
I guess I’ve implied an element of nostalgia, but I think there are real world benefits too which people forget. The way film captures light, with an s-curve of light sensitivity, makes it very different from a digital sensor, and I happen to prefer that aesthetic. For portraits, film grain is particularly kind on skin in comparison with digital sensors - I rarely have to clean up flaws. If you work largely in medium format as I do, then film is your only real option - the quality of camera and lens available on the second hand market is exceptional, much better value for money and build quality than most modern DSLRs, and the price of digital medium format makes it totally unrealistic. I also like the secondary aspects - the use of different developers and different techniques to manipulate the negative. And it’s healthier too ;-) - less time in front of a computer screen!

5. Tell us more about your analog Equipment. What are you using at the moment?
From the Nikkormat mentioned above I moved on to Contax G2 and then a Mamiya 6 for my first taste of medium format. Now I use a Hasselblad 500c/m, along with a Pentax 67II and a Contax 645 for portrait work, but I tend to favour a Mamiya 7II for landscapes or any situation where I’ll be walking with the camera for some time. Then there are occasional forays into large format, pinhole, plastic cameras, Instax, polaroid etc.

6. What is your favorite Black and white film and what is your favorite color one?
I started with Kodak Tri-X and I’ve just returned to it as my favorite b&w film for general use. I’m also a big fan of Fuji Acros for bright days. For colour films I think the new Kodak Portras are fantastic, as well as Ektar. On slide I like Provia, especially 400X.

7. Do you develop on your own? And how do you scan your photos? 
I home-develop all my b&w film, in Kodak HC-110 or occasionally Moersch developers like Tanol. I used to use Diafine, but my batch got too old and I can’t get hold of it any more, which is a shame. Most of a my colour film I get done cheaply at Genie Imaging in London. I then scan both color and b&w at home on an Epson V700.

8. You did a very nice photo shooting with Francesca Miles. You used a Pentax 67II with a black and white film. For the color work you used your Nikon D7000. As Francesca is a well-known model was it normal for her that you did some “analog” stuff? 
Francesca was one of the first models I shot with, in 2010, and I don’t think she’d done a shoot on film before, but it really excited her and I’m pleased to see she still uses the shots on her website. I’ve found that lots of models actually like the idea of film and are more keen to see the results.

9. Do you have a favorite photo of your photos? And why is it your favorite one?
Difficult. Actually, I don’t think I can pick one - I feel I still have so far to go as a photographer - I want to say more and achieve more, not sit still.

10. The last sentence is for you - What do want to tell us? Is anything you want to do in future with your analog photography?
This year I have many plans about where I want to go with my photography. I want to get more into large format and also to experiment with more expressive image making and alternative processes. I also want to develop some more coherent projects and series, and work towards a zine or a book publication of some sort. And I might try to pull out of digital entirely for a while too, let the wonderful world of analogue take me where it wishes to!

Donovan Rees: FlickrHomepage

36-frames:

10 questions, one photographer: Donovan Rees

Donovan is a 34 year-old Londoner and spent most of his life there, apart from four years living in the US. Donovan travels a lot and his outlook on life is international. Actually Donovan is a dealer in rare and antiquarian books, manuscripts and photobooks. His second home is photography and it takes up most of his free time and most of his soul as he told me.

I found Donovan on flick. I was so inspired cos his portfolio looks a little bit like my own. You found a little bit of everything. Portrait, landscape, streetart and photos from his journeys. Directly i loved his style and that he is open for so many things in photography. So, here comes the interview:


1. What I really like about your flickr portfolio is that you shoot people, landscape and even some street art. Why you do that. What inspires you about photography?

I’ve always tried to stretch across genres. I didn’t start taking ‘portraits’ as such until quite late, but in some way most of my landscapes and urban scenes are actually about people too. One of the most impactful aspects of a photograph of a wilderness in Iceland or Scotland is the absence of people, so you’re always working in relation to that even if they don’t feature. I like the traces people leave behind on places, physically and emotionally. That applies to portraits too I think, which is why I tend to prefer a context - even when the subject is staring straight at the camera you are only getting a shadow of their presence. One of the most fascinating things for me about photography as a medium is its ability to be truth-telling and fictional at the same time, and one can take it so many ways depending on where you want to sit on that spectrum.


2. Do you have a favorite kind of photography?
I’m not sure I do. I like to be able to run with whatever situation I’m presented. As a viewer of photography rather than a practitioner I tend to go towards the social documentary photographers first.


3. Some of your especially portrait shoots a made with a digital DSLR, some are made on film. Why do you change between digital and analog photography?
I first came to photography using film, when I took a cranky old Nikkormat and a single 35mm lens to South America on a gap year between school and university. It had no light-meter, so I learned the ‘Sunny 16’ rule and guessed exposures, and it was a fantastic introduction to photography. One of the main reasons I still use film is that, despite all the wonderful conveniences of digital, I don’t experience the same thrill or the same magnificent uncertainty - you leave yourself so little room for serendipity or the unexpected. I do switch back and forth of course, and just for my own sense of security I’ll always shoot weddings using both, though I still tend to prefer the film shots at the end of the day.


4. Why do you still use analog film cameras? Is it because of nostalgia?
I guess I’ve implied an element of nostalgia, but I think there are real world benefits too which people forget. The way film captures light, with an s-curve of light sensitivity, makes it very different from a digital sensor, and I happen to prefer that aesthetic. For portraits, film grain is particularly kind on skin in comparison with digital sensors - I rarely have to clean up flaws. If you work largely in medium format as I do, then film is your only real option - the quality of camera and lens available on the second hand market is exceptional, much better value for money and build quality than most modern DSLRs, and the price of digital medium format makes it totally unrealistic. I also like the secondary aspects - the use of different developers and different techniques to manipulate the negative. And it’s healthier too ;-) - less time in front of a computer screen!


5. Tell us more about your analog Equipment. What are you using at the moment?
From the Nikkormat mentioned above I moved on to Contax G2 and then a Mamiya 6 for my first taste of medium format. Now I use a Hasselblad 500c/m, along with a Pentax 67II and a Contax 645 for portrait work, but I tend to favour a Mamiya 7II for landscapes or any situation where I’ll be walking with the camera for some time. Then there are occasional forays into large format, pinhole, plastic cameras, Instax, polaroid etc.


6. What is your favorite Black and white film and what is your favorite color one?
I started with Kodak Tri-X and I’ve just returned to it as my favorite b&w film for general use. I’m also a big fan of Fuji Acros for bright days. For colour films I think the new Kodak Portras are fantastic, as well as Ektar. On slide I like Provia, especially 400X.


7. Do you develop on your own? And how do you scan your photos?
I home-develop all my b&w film, in Kodak HC-110 or occasionally Moersch developers like Tanol. I used to use Diafine, but my batch got too old and I can’t get hold of it any more, which is a shame. Most of a my colour film I get done cheaply at Genie Imaging in London. I then scan both color and b&w at home on an Epson V700.


8. You did a very nice photo shooting with Francesca Miles. You used a Pentax 67II with a black and white film. For the color work you used your Nikon D7000. As Francesca is a well-known model was it normal for her that you did some “analog” stuff?
Francesca was one of the first models I shot with, in 2010, and I don’t think she’d done a shoot on film before, but it really excited her and I’m pleased to see she still uses the shots on her website. I’ve found that lots of models actually like the idea of film and are more keen to see the results.


9. Do you have a favorite photo of your photos? And why is it your favorite one?
Difficult. Actually, I don’t think I can pick one - I feel I still have so far to go as a photographer - I want to say more and achieve more, not sit still.


10. The last sentence is for you - What do want to tell us? Is anything you want to do in future with your analog photography?
This year I have many plans about where I want to go with my photography. I want to get more into large format and also to experiment with more expressive image making and alternative processes. I also want to develop some more coherent projects and series, and work towards a zine or a book publication of some sort. And I might try to pull out of digital entirely for a while too, let the wonderful world of analogue take me where it wishes to!


Donovan Rees:
Flickr
Homepage

16 Anmerkungen

36-frames:

10 Fragen, ein Fotograf: Florian Weiler

Florian, ich folge Dir erst seit kurzem, aber Dein Portfolio hat mich gleich begeistert. Du bist “Profifotograf”  und als Weddingfotograf buchbar.

1. Florian, Du bist Profi. Wie bist Du dazu gekommen und seit wann fotografierst Du schon?
Ich bin in nur soweit Profi, dass mir die Fotografie ein attraktives Nebeneinkommen beschert - leben kann/muss/brauch ich davon nicht ;-) Doch auch in meinem Hauptjob habe ich viel mit Fotografie zu tun, wenn auch aus einem anderen Blickwinkel.
Meine erste Kamera hatte ich zu Grundschulzeiten bereits in der Hand - damals eine Canon A-1. Danach dümpelte mein Interesse für viele Jahre so vor sich hin, bis ich 2004 meine erste digitale coolpix 3700 mein Eigen nennen durfte. Zusammen mit meinem Pool an Kameras und Objektiven wuchs anschließend auch meine Begeisterung für die Fotografie. Irgendwie muss sich dann in meinem Freundes- und Bekanntenkreis herumgesprochen haben, dass ich nicht nur über eine brauchbare Ausrüstung verfüge, sondern auch noch halbwegs damit umgehen kann und so dauerte es auch nicht lange bis das erste Pärchen vor der Tür stand mit der Frage, ob ich nicht mal Lust hätte ein Hochzeit zu fotografieren.
2. Du nutzt sowohl digitale Kameras, wie auch analoge Filmkameras. Was macht für Dich den größten Unterschied aus?
Für die eigentliche Arbeit hinter der Kamera ist die Möglichkeit, ein unmittelbares Feedback über das aufgenommene Foto in Form eines Vorschaubildes an der Kamera (oder einem Monitor) zu erhalten, schon ein riesen Vorteil der Digitaltechnik gegenüber Film. Dadurch erreicht man eine steile Lernkurve was das eigene fotografische Können anbetrifft und ein hohes Maß an Sicherheit gegenüber dem Kunden.3. Hast du schon einmal eine Hochzeit rein analog fotografiert oder überhaupt auf einer Hochzeit auch mal Filme benutzt oder verläßt Du Dich auf Deine digitale Ausrüstung.
Insbesondere der zweite Aspekt in dem vorherigen Punkt führt dazu, dass ich auf Hochzeiten ausschließlich digital fotografiere. Dazu kommen aber auch Abwägungen bezüglich Kosten, Workflow, Geschwindigkeit etc.

4. Auch bei Dir entstehen mit den analogen Kameras sehr sinnliche Porträtaufnahmen. Es sieht so aus als ob Du gerade in freien Projekten lieber die analogen Kameras benutzt. Was ist der Reiz?
Danke und ja, wenn ich Zeit und Muße habe, greife ich gern zu analogen Kameras. Die Gründe dafür sind vielfältig. Weit vorn steht aber zweifellos der Umstand, dass ich ein Bild, welches aus meinem Scanner kommt, fast immer als “fertig” erachte. Es weckt nicht das Bedürfnis in mir, es weiter bearbeiten, in irgendeiner Form vervollkommnen, zu müssen. Dazu gesellt sich meine große Liebe zum Filmkorn. Es bringt Leben in ein Foto - nimmt ihm die sterile, technische Perfektion, die es als reine Abbildung einer Szenerie aufweisen kann. Natürlich bin ich mir bewusst, dass man dies auch mit dem ein oder anderen digitalen Helferchen erreichen kann, doch warum “schummeln” wenn es auch einen authentische Weg gibt?

5. Die People-Fotografie scheint Dir besonders am Herzen zu liegen. Was ist das Spannende für Dich daran?
Fotografie bleibt in der Mehrzahl ihrer Ausprägungen recht passiv. Denkt man nur z. B. an die Landschaftsfotografie, wo man zwar viele Rahmenbedingungen wählen kann, aber der Eingriff in die Szenerie in aller Regel unterbleibt. Oder gar die Reportage, wo es eine Beeinflussung des Motivs zwingend auszuschließen gilt. In der People-Fotografie ist das hingegen ganz anders. Hier dominiert die Interaktion - der Dialog. Model und Fotograf gestalten das Bild gemeinsam und in (fast) all seinen Aspekten.
Außerdem ist man beim Knipsen nie allein :-) 

6. Welche analoge Ausrüstung hast Du und auf welche Kamera könntest Du nicht mehr verzichten?
Ich besitze eine Pentax 67, eine Canon A-1 und seit kurzem eine Graflex Speed Graphic, bin darüber hinaus aber auch in der glücklichen Lage, mir leicht und unbürokratische Kameras leihen zu können - auch analoge. Gern nutze ich das Leica M- und R-System, sowie die Contax 645. Insbesondere die hochgeöffneten Objektive haben es mir angetan. Zu einem meiner Lieblinge ist mittlerweile das Leica 0,95/50 geworden.
Mehr als eine einzelne Kamera schätze ich jedoch die Möglichkeit, zwischen den verschiedenen Systemen und Formaten hin und her wechseln zu können.  7. Was ist Dein Lieblings-SW-Film und welcher Dein Lieblings-Farbfilm? 
Ich habe mit Kodak Portra und TriX angefangen und bin mehr oder weniger auch dabei geblieben. Wobei ich aber auch nie besonders viel herum experimentiert habe. Beide Filme geben mir das, was ich suche, ein kontrastreiches SW-Bild und eine wundervoll sanfte Farbwiedergabe von Hauttönen.8. Entwickelst Du selber oder gibt es ein Fachlabor, das Du nutzt? Wenn ja, welches und wie scannst Du Deine Fotos?
Mit C41 habe ich mich bisher nicht auseinander gesetzt, so dass alle Farbfilme ins Labor nach Stuttgart wandern ;-) Die SW-Bilder entwickle ich i.d.R. selbst. Auch das Scannen übernehme ich eigenhändig. Habe dazu einen Epson v750pro, mit dem ich recht zufrieden bin.

9. Man sieht Deinen Fotos die eigene Kreativität gut an. Nichtsdestotrotz will man ja auch immer wissen, was andere so machen. Gibt es aktuelle Fotografen, die ebenfalls noch Film nutzen und Dich inspirieren?
Ja.10. Wenn Du einen Wunsch für eine Location frei hättest, wo würdest Du gerne mal ein Model fotografieren?
Äh, hm, nunja - muss gestehen, dass mir die Antwort auf diese Frage am schwersten fällt. Nicht da mir keine interessanten Orte einfallen würde, sondern eher, da ich keinen hervorheben möchte. Es ist, als würde man sich ein absolutes Ziel setzen, was den Nachteil hat, dass man es irgendwann auch erreichen kann. Und dann? Mir sind relative Ziele da viel lieber. Eines der schönsten formuliert dieses japanische Sprichwort: “… Wichtig ist, besser zu sein als du gestern warst!”


Vielen Dank für das Gespräch. Wer mehr über die Arbeit von Florian Weiler erfahren möchte, der findet ihn hier: http://www.florian-weiler.de/https://www.facebook.com/FlorianWeilerPhotographyhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/florian-weiler/http://www.fotocommunity.de/fotograf/ian-flor/1588001

36-frames:

10 Fragen, ein Fotograf: Florian Weiler

Florian, ich folge Dir erst seit kurzem, aber Dein Portfolio hat mich gleich begeistert. Du bist “Profifotograf” und als Weddingfotograf buchbar.


1. Florian, Du bist Profi. Wie bist Du dazu gekommen und seit wann fotografierst Du schon?
Ich bin in nur soweit Profi, dass mir die Fotografie ein attraktives Nebeneinkommen beschert - leben kann/muss/brauch ich davon nicht ;-) Doch auch in meinem Hauptjob habe ich viel mit Fotografie zu tun, wenn auch aus einem anderen Blickwinkel.
Meine erste Kamera hatte ich zu Grundschulzeiten bereits in der Hand - damals eine Canon A-1. Danach dümpelte mein Interesse für viele Jahre so vor sich hin, bis ich 2004 meine erste digitale coolpix 3700 mein Eigen nennen durfte. Zusammen mit meinem Pool an Kameras und Objektiven wuchs anschließend auch meine Begeisterung für die Fotografie. Irgendwie muss sich dann in meinem Freundes- und Bekanntenkreis herumgesprochen haben, dass ich nicht nur über eine brauchbare Ausrüstung verfüge, sondern auch noch halbwegs damit umgehen kann und so dauerte es auch nicht lange bis das erste Pärchen vor der Tür stand mit der Frage, ob ich nicht mal Lust hätte ein Hochzeit zu fotografieren.

2. Du nutzt sowohl digitale Kameras, wie auch analoge Filmkameras. Was macht für Dich den größten Unterschied aus?

Für die eigentliche Arbeit hinter der Kamera ist die Möglichkeit, ein unmittelbares Feedback über das aufgenommene Foto in Form eines Vorschaubildes an der Kamera (oder einem Monitor) zu erhalten, schon ein riesen Vorteil der Digitaltechnik gegenüber Film. Dadurch erreicht man eine steile Lernkurve was das eigene fotografische Können anbetrifft und ein hohes Maß an Sicherheit gegenüber dem Kunden.

3. Hast du schon einmal eine Hochzeit rein analog fotografiert oder überhaupt auf einer Hochzeit auch mal Filme benutzt oder verläßt Du Dich auf Deine digitale Ausrüstung.

Insbesondere der zweite Aspekt in dem vorherigen Punkt führt dazu, dass ich auf Hochzeiten ausschließlich digital fotografiere. Dazu kommen aber auch Abwägungen bezüglich Kosten, Workflow, Geschwindigkeit etc.


4. Auch bei Dir entstehen mit den analogen Kameras sehr sinnliche Porträtaufnahmen. Es sieht so aus als ob Du gerade in freien Projekten lieber die analogen Kameras benutzt. Was ist der Reiz?
Danke und ja, wenn ich Zeit und Muße habe, greife ich gern zu analogen Kameras. Die Gründe dafür sind vielfältig. Weit vorn steht aber zweifellos der Umstand, dass ich ein Bild, welches aus meinem Scanner kommt, fast immer als “fertig” erachte. Es weckt nicht das Bedürfnis in mir, es weiter bearbeiten, in irgendeiner Form vervollkommnen, zu müssen. Dazu gesellt sich meine große Liebe zum Filmkorn. Es bringt Leben in ein Foto - nimmt ihm die sterile, technische Perfektion, die es als reine Abbildung einer Szenerie aufweisen kann. Natürlich bin ich mir bewusst, dass man dies auch mit dem ein oder anderen digitalen Helferchen erreichen kann, doch warum “schummeln” wenn es auch einen authentische Weg gibt?


5. Die People-Fotografie scheint Dir besonders am Herzen zu liegen. Was ist das Spannende für Dich daran?
Fotografie bleibt in der Mehrzahl ihrer Ausprägungen recht passiv. Denkt man nur z. B. an die Landschaftsfotografie, wo man zwar viele Rahmenbedingungen wählen kann, aber der Eingriff in die Szenerie in aller Regel unterbleibt. Oder gar die Reportage, wo es eine Beeinflussung des Motivs zwingend auszuschließen gilt. In der People-Fotografie ist das hingegen ganz anders. Hier dominiert die Interaktion - der Dialog. Model und Fotograf gestalten das Bild gemeinsam und in (fast) all seinen Aspekten.
Außerdem ist man beim Knipsen nie allein :-)


6. Welche analoge Ausrüstung hast Du und auf welche Kamera könntest Du nicht mehr verzichten?
Ich besitze eine Pentax 67, eine Canon A-1 und seit kurzem eine Graflex Speed Graphic, bin darüber hinaus aber auch in der glücklichen Lage, mir leicht und unbürokratische Kameras leihen zu können - auch analoge. Gern nutze ich das Leica M- und R-System, sowie die Contax 645. Insbesondere die hochgeöffneten Objektive haben es mir angetan. Zu einem meiner Lieblinge ist mittlerweile das Leica 0,95/50 geworden.
Mehr als eine einzelne Kamera schätze ich jedoch die Möglichkeit, zwischen den verschiedenen Systemen und Formaten hin und her wechseln zu können.

7. Was ist Dein Lieblings-SW-Film und welcher Dein Lieblings-Farbfilm?

Ich habe mit Kodak Portra und TriX angefangen und bin mehr oder weniger auch dabei geblieben. Wobei ich aber auch nie besonders viel herum experimentiert habe. Beide Filme geben mir das, was ich suche, ein kontrastreiches SW-Bild und eine wundervoll sanfte Farbwiedergabe von Hauttönen.

8. Entwickelst Du selber oder gibt es ein Fachlabor, das Du nutzt? Wenn ja, welches und wie scannst Du Deine Fotos?

Mit C41 habe ich mich bisher nicht auseinander gesetzt, so dass alle Farbfilme ins Labor nach Stuttgart wandern ;-) Die SW-Bilder entwickle ich i.d.R. selbst. Auch das Scannen übernehme ich eigenhändig. Habe dazu einen Epson v750pro, mit dem ich recht zufrieden bin.


9. Man sieht Deinen Fotos die eigene Kreativität gut an. Nichtsdestotrotz will man ja auch immer wissen, was andere so machen. Gibt es aktuelle Fotografen, die ebenfalls noch Film nutzen und Dich inspirieren?
Ja.

10. Wenn Du einen Wunsch für eine Location frei hättest, wo würdest Du gerne mal ein Model fotografieren?

Äh, hm, nunja - muss gestehen, dass mir die Antwort auf diese Frage am schwersten fällt. Nicht da mir keine interessanten Orte einfallen würde, sondern eher, da ich keinen hervorheben möchte. Es ist, als würde man sich ein absolutes Ziel setzen, was den Nachteil hat, dass man es irgendwann auch erreichen kann. Und dann? Mir sind relative Ziele da viel lieber. Eines der schönsten formuliert dieses japanische Sprichwort: “… Wichtig ist, besser zu sein als du gestern warst!”


Vielen Dank für das Gespräch. Wer mehr über die Arbeit von Florian Weiler erfahren möchte, der findet ihn hier:
http://www.florian-weiler.de/
https://www.facebook.com/FlorianWeilerPhotography
http://www.flickr.com/photos/florian-weiler/
http://www.fotocommunity.de/fotograf/ian-flor/1588001

Anmerkungen

Party
Canon 300n
Canon EF 50mm 1.8
3200 Iso

Party
Canon 300n
Canon EF 50mm 1.8
3200 Iso

65 Anmerkungen

copycats:

"Gummi Bears" Theme Song by Alicia Keys

Anmerkungen

Listen/purchase: Awake by Tycho

1208 Anmerkungen

I like!

scalesofperception:

Above the Ruhr | Jakob Wagner

"Above the Ruhr" shows a collection of 35 aerial photographs from the Ruhr district, Germany’s biggest urban and industrial area. All photographs were taken in July 2013 on a gas-ballon flight from Gladbeck to Anrath, Germany.

639980 Anmerkungen